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Stanley Roy Badmin

  1906 - 1989
 
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Richmond Bridge

Richmond Bridge   1931

Original etching.

Presentation proof given by the artist to a couple on to occasion of their wedding, aside from the normal edition.

£985



Wareham, Dorset

Wareham, Dorset   1934

Original etching.

Very good impression from the collection of Kenneth M. Guichard, author of British Etchers 1850-1940.

£780



Burford, Oxfordshire sold

Burford, Oxfordshire   1931

Original etching.

The artist’s own personal exhibition proof, aside from the normal numbered edition. Inscribed in pencil by S.R. Badmin “Cotswolds”

SOLD



Shepton Mallet, Somerset sold

Shepton Mallet, Somerset   1930

Original etching.

Excellent impression from the only edition of 50 signed and numbered proofs, as issued for the artist by the Twenty-One Gallery in 1930.

SOLD



Richmond, Yorkshire sold

Richmond, Yorkshire   1935

Original etching.

The artist’s own personal exhibition proof, aside from the normal numbered edition.

SOLD



The Old Ash sold

The Old Ash   1929

Original etching.

The artist’s own personal exhibition proof, aside from the normal numbered edition. Inscribed in pencil by S.R. Badmin “Artist’s Proof” “A few only”.

SOLD



Coleford, Somerset sold

Coleford, Somerset   1929

Original etching.

Particularly beautiful impression printed on warm cream vellum-style paper. From the only edition of 40 signed and numbered proofs, as issued for the artist by the Twenty-One Gallery in 1929.

SOLD

 

The technically brilliant etchings of Stanley Badmin, student and protégé of R.S. Austin, won immediate critical acclaim and financial success upon his introduction to the Twenty-One Gallery in 1928. However, his outstanding career in this field was to be cut short by the decline in the etching market after the depression, and in 1936 he forsook etching in favour of the financial rewards of watercolour illustration. S.R. Badmin produced 40 recorded plates during his brief but remarkable career as an etcher, each worked in his own distinctive and carefully wrought style.

Stanley R. Badmin's etchings were produced using a carefully planned method, quite unique to his work, in which the image is drawn in stages. Badmin would draw the part which he intended to print darkest first, and would immerse the plate in acid with only this small part of the image prepared. After this area had been bitten sufficiently, he would remove the plate from the acid and draw in the area intended to be next darkest. The plate would be immersed in stages, with the drawing progressing in this manner at each stage. This method is in complete contrast with the traditional practice of making the whole drawing at once and subsequently stopping out the lighter areas as each is bitten sufficiently. Stanley Badmin's method avoided the time-consuming process of stopping out whilst allowing him to create an image of the finest detail with the most subtle tonal variations. [more]